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Cover image for Natural hazards : earth's processes as hazards, disasters and catastrophes
Title:
Natural hazards : earth's processes as hazards, disasters and catastrophes
Personal Author:
Edition:
2nd ed.
Publication Information:
Upper Saddle River, NJ : Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2008
Physical Description:
xx, 488 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 28 cm.
ISBN:
9780132318648
General Note:
Accompanied by CD-ROM : CP 013685
Subject Term:

Available:*

Library
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Material Type
Item Category 1
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30000010178252 GB5014 K44 2008 Open Access Book Book
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Summary

Summary

For professors and students of natural hazards or courses in earthquakes and volcanoes, Edward A. Keller and Robert H. Blodgett's treatment of fundamental scientific concepts addresses societal interactions and Earth processes.


Author Notes

Edward A. Keller

Ed Keller is a professor, researcher, writer, and most importantly, mentor and teacher to undergraduate and graduate students. Currently, Dr. keller's students are working on earthquake hazards, how waves of sediment move through a river system following disturbance, and geologic controld on habitat to endangered southern steelhead trout. He was born and raised in California (Bachelor's degree in Geology and Mathematics from California State University at Fresno, Master's degree in Geology from University of California at Davis), it was while pursuing his Ph.D. in Geology from Purdue University in 1973 that Ed wrote the first edition of Environmental Geology , the text that became the foundation of the environmental geology curriculum. Ed joined the faculty of the University of California Santa Barbara in 1976 and has been there since, serving multiple times as the chair of both the Environmental Studies and Hydrologic Science programs. In that time he has been the author on over 100 articles, including seminal works on fluvial processes and tectonic geomorphology. Ed's academic honors include the Don J. Easterbrook Distinguished Scientist Award, Geological Society of America (2004), Quatercentenary Fellowship from Cambridge University, England (2000), two Outstanding Alumnus Awards from Purdue University (1994, 1996), A Distinguished Alumnus Award from California State University at Fresno (1998), the Outstanding Outreach Award from Southern California Earthquake Center (1999).

Ed and his wife Valery, who brings clarity to his writing, love walks on the beach at sunset and when the night herons guard moonlight sand at Arrroyo Burro Beach in Santa Barbara.

Robert H. Blodgett

Bob Blodgett is Professor of Geology at Austin Community College in Austin, Texas, where he teaches natural hazards and disasters, environmental, physical, and historical geology, as well as environmental science, and manages the college's Edwards Aquifer monitoring well and is physical sciences safety coordinator. Bob has nearly 25 years of teaching experience, including positions on the faculties of Ohio State University and Dickinson College.

He is a Licensed Professional Geoscientist and worked for six years in the state of Texas Public Drinking Water Program leading a team of scientists evaluating the vulnerability of drinking water to contamination, and for two years at the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology conducting environmental assessments of abandoned mined lands. His research on terrestrial sedimentary processes resulted in published papers on braided streams, ancient soils, and fossil burrows.

Bob has practical experience planning for and responding to natural hazards. While in the Air Force he served as the disaster preparedness officer for the remote Indian Mountain Air Force Station in Alaska, and for the underground Cheyenne Mountain Command post of the North American Aerospace Defense Command in Colorado Springs.

He traces his interest in natural hazards back to Alma Petrini, his second grade teacher in Detroit, whose lesson on volcanoes and earthquakes came alive with stories and pictures of her trips to Paricutin and Pompeii, and to lava samples that Gordon Macdonald, then director of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, sent him for his class project. These experiences led to a life-long interest in geology including three degrees, a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, an M.S. from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.

Bob and his partner Jeff, who helps him focus on the important things in life, enjoy traveling, exploring new restaurants, and making a home with their dog Mona.


Table of Contents

First Draft Revised Outline for Natural Hazards 2e
1 Introduction to Natural Hazards
Case History Nevado del Ruiz, Columbia
Importance Role of history
Geologic cycles
Five fundamental concepts
Natural service functions
Global change
Case Study
Human Population through History
Case Study
The Magnitude
Frequency Concept
2 Earthquakes
Case History
Earthquakes of Early 2001
Introduction and measurement Processes
Ground motion
Regions at risk Effects
Linkages with other hazards volcanoes, landslides, liquefaction, tsunamis, subsidence, fire, disease
Natural service functions
Human interactions
Forecasts, predictions, and warnings
Mitigation Perception and adjustments
Case Study
Earthquakes in Canada (modified from existing Survivor Story)
Case Study
New Madrid, Missouri 1811-1812
Survivor Story
Professional Profile
Andrea Donnellan, Earthquake Forecaster
3 Tsunamis
Introduction
Processes types of water waves, currents, seiches
Regions at risk Effects
Linkages with other hazards earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, impacts
Natural service functions
Human interactions
Detection and warnings
Mitigation Perception and adjustments
Case Study
Volcanic Landslides and Tsunamis
Case Study
Indonesian Tsunami of 2004
Case Study (one or two additional) 1700
Tsunami in Pacific Northwest, 1958
Tsunami in Lituya Bay, AK, or Mitigation and Preparedness in Japan
Survivor Story
Tsunami in the Lowest Country on Earth Professional
Profile [a researcher (Kerry Sieh at Cal Tech or Jose Barrero at USC), a Pacific Tsunami
Warning Center staff member, or an educator (Lori Dengler at Humboldt State)]
4 Volcanoes
Case History
Mt. Unzem, 1991
Introduction types and features
Regions at risk Effects
Linkages with other hazards earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, climate change, fire, subsidence
Natural service functions
Human interactions
Forecasts and warnings
Mitigation Perception and adjustments
Case Study
Yellowstone Caldera Supervolcano
Case Study
Volcanic Ash and Aviation
Professional Profile
Chris Eisinger, Studying Active
Volcanoes Survivor Story
A Close Call with Mount St. Helens
5 Flooding
Case History replace with Mid-Atlantic States floods of 2006
Introduction rivers and fluvial processes
Processes Regions at risk Effects
Linkages with other hazards landslides, storms, glaciers, tsunamis, fire, climate change
Natural service functions
Human interactions
Forecasts and warnings
Mitigation Perception and adjustments
Case Study
Alluvial Fan
Flooding on the Ventura River
Case Study
Magnitude and Frequency of Floods
Case Study
Flash Floods of Eastern Ohio
Survivor Story
Flash Flood
Professional Profile (Ana Barros, Harvard or Eve Gruntfest at Colorado)
6 Mass Wasting
Case History
Portuguese Bend, California
Introduction types (falls, slides, flows) and processes
Regions at risk Effects
Linkages with other hazards earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, storms, flooding, fire
Natural service functions
Human interactions
Forecasts and warnings
Mitigation Perception and adjustments
Case Study
La Conchita: Southern California
Landslide Disaster of 2005
Lessons Learned
Case Study
Snow Avalanche
Forecasting and Control
Survivor Story
Landslide Professional Pr
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