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Cover image for Introduction to fluid mechanics
Title:
Introduction to fluid mechanics
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Oxford University Press, 2005
Physical Description:
1v + 1 CD-ROM
ISBN:
9780195154511
General Note:
Accompanied by compact disc : CP 5928
Subject Term:

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30000004304360 QA911 S42 2005 Open Access Book Book
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30000010077041 QA911 S42 2005 Open Access Book Book
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30000010077040 QA911 S42 2005 Unknown
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Summary

Summary

Introduction to Fluid Mechanics provides a balanced and uniquely visual treatment of the tools used in solving modern fluid mechanics problems. Presenting an image-intensive approach to fluid dynamics through classic kinematic concepts, the book demonstrates the importance of flow visualization in a framework of modern experimental techniques and flow simulation.

Detailed photographs and diagrams of fluid motions and phenomena throughout the text help students to see and understand why equations change drastically for different types of flows. Output illustrations from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) programs illustrate the possibilities of flow behavior, enabling students to concentrate on ideas instead of mathematics. The book also provides the means to solve interesting problems early in the course by presenting case studies at the beginning of the text. These cases are revisited later to reinforce empirical rules and help explain advanced methods of analyzing a flow.

Creating a foundation for further study in this important and exciting field, Introduction to Fluid Mechanics is ideal for a first course in fluid mechanics. The book is designed to accommodate students concentrating in mechanical engineering as well as those in the civil, aerospace, and chemical engineering fields.

Features



#65533;A highly organized 2-color interior and icons throughout the text aid in navigation and review.


#65533;CFD icons indicate subject matter that directly or indirectly relates to computational methods to familiarize students with this powerful tool.


#65533;FE icons note material that is covered in the Fundamentals of Engineering exam to help students prepare.


#65533;Chapters on differential analysis of flow and on applications of fluid mechanics are self-contained so that instructors can pick and choose which topics to cover.

An Instructor's Manual and CD are available to adopters.


Author Notes

Edward J. Shaughnessy, Jr., is Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at Duke University.


Table of Contents

Prefacep. xiii
1 Fundamentals
Chapter 1 Fundamental Concepts
1.1 Introductionp. 3
1.2 Gases, Liquids, and Solidsp. 14
1.3 Methods of Descriptionp. 22
1.4 Dimensions and Unit Systemsp. 29
1.5 Problem Solvingp. 34
1.6 Summaryp. 35
Problemsp. 36
Chapter 2 Fluid Properties
2.1 Introductionp. 43
2.2 Mass, Weight, and Densityp. 43
2.3 Pressurep. 51
2.4 Temperature and Other Thermal Propertiesp. 64
2.5 The Perfect Gas Lawp. 70
2.6 Bulk Compressibility Modulusp. 73
2.7 Viscosityp. 80
2.8 Surface Tensionp. 85
2.9 Fluid Energyp. 93
2.10 Summaryp. 97
Problemsp. 99
Chapter 3 Case Studies in Fluid Mechanics
3.1 Introductionp. 103
3.2 Common Dimensionless Groups in Fluid Mechanicsp. 105
3.3 Case Studiesp. 114
3.4 Summaryp. 140
Problemsp. 141
Chapter 4 Fluid Forces
4.1 Introductionp. 146
4.2 Classification of Fluid Forcesp. 148
4.3 The Origins of Body and Surface Forcesp. 149
4.4 Body Forcesp. 152
4.5 Surface Forcesp. 160
4.6 Stress in a Fluidp. 178
4.7 Force Balance in a Fluidp. 187
4.8 Summaryp. 190
Problemsp. 191
Chapter 5 Fluid Statics
5.1 Introductionp. 197
5.2 Hydrostatic Stressp. 199
5.3 Hydrostatic Equationp. 201
5.4 Hydrostatic Pressure Distributionp. 210
5.5 Hydrostatic Forcep. 233
5.6 Hydrostatic Momentp. 252
5.7 Resultant Force and Point of Applicationp. 267
5.8 Buoyancy and Archimedes' Principlep. 269
5.9 Equilibrium and Stability of Immersed Bodiesp. 275
5.10 Summaryp. 278
Problemsp. 280
Chapter 6 The Velocity Field and Fluid Transport
6.1 Introductionp. 299
6.2 The Fluid Velocity Fieldp. 300
6.3 Fluid Accelerationp. 312
6.4 The Substantial Derivativep. 319
6.5 Classification of Flowsp. 320
6.6 No-Slip, No-Penetration Boundary Conditionsp. 336
6.7 Fluid Transportp. 337
6.8 Average Velocity and Flowratep. 358
6.9 Summaryp. 363
Problemsp. 365
Chapter 7 Control Volume Analysis
7.1 Introductionp. 375
7.2 Basic Concepts: System and Control Volumep. 376
7.3 System and Control Volume Analysisp. 377
7.4 Reynolds Transport Theorem for a Systemp. 381
7.5 Reynolds Transport Theorem for a Control Volumep. 382
7.6 Control Volume Analysisp. 385
7.7 Summaryp. 450
Problemsp. 452
Chapter 8 Flow of an Inviscid Fluid: the Bernoulli Equation
8.1 Introductionp. 474
8.2 Frictionless Flow Along a Streamlinep. 475
8.3 Bernoulli Equationp. 477
8.4 Static, Dynamic, Stagnation, and Total Pressurep. 490
8.5 Applications of the Bernoulli Equationp. 496
8.6 Relationship to the Energy Equationp. 521
8.7 Summaryp. 524
Problemsp. 526
Chapter 9 Dimensional Analysis and Similitude
9.1 Introductionp. 534
9.2 Buckingham Pi Theoremp. 536
9.3 Repeating Variable Methodp. 540
9.4 Similitude and Model Developmentp. 549
9.5 Correlation of Experimental Datap. 554
9.6 Application to Case Studiesp. 557
9.7 Summaryp. 563
Problemsp. 564
2 Differential Analysis of Flow
Chapter 10 Elements of Flow Visualization and Flow Structure
10.1 Introductionp. 573
10.2 Lagrangian Kinematicsp. 578
10.3 The Eulerian-Lagrangian Connectionp. 590
10.4 Material Lines, Surfaces, and Volumesp. 592
10.5 Pathlines and Streaklinesp. 597
10.6 Streamlines and Streamtubesp. 603
10.7 Motion and Deformationp. 607
10.8 Velocity Gradientp. 612
10.9 Rate of Rotationp. 619
10.10 Rate of Expansionp. 635
10.11 Rate of Shear Deformationp. 650
10.12 Summaryp. 653
Problemsp. 654
Chapter 11 Governing Equations of Fluid Dynamics
11.1 Introductionp. 659
11.2 Continuity Equationp. 660
11.3 Momentum Equationp. 666
11.4 Constitutive Model for a Newtonian Fluidp. 671
11.5 Navier-Stokes Equationsp. 678
11.6 Euler Equationsp. 683
11.7 The Energy Equationp. 699
11.8 Discussionp. 702
11.9 Summaryp. 708
Problemsp. 709
Chapter 12 Analysis of Incompressible Flow
12.1 Introductionp. 713
12.2 Steady Viscous Flowp. 718
12.3 Unsteady Viscous Flowp. 744
12.4 Turbulent Flowp. 754
12.5 Inviscid Irrotational Flowp. 760
12.6 Summaryp. 780
Problemsp. 782
3 Applications
Chapter 13 Flow in Pipes and Ducts
13.1 Introductionp. 791
13.2 Steady, Fully Developed Flow in a Pipe or Ductp. 793
13.3 Analysis of Flow in Single Path Pipe and Duct Systemsp. 817
13.4 Analysis of Flow in Multiple Path Pipe and Duct Systemsp. 846
13.5 Elements of Pipe and Duct System Designp. 851
13.6 Summaryp. 864
Problemsp. 867
Chapter 14 External Flow
14.1 Introductionp. 882
14.2 Boundary Layers: Basic Conceptsp. 884
14.3 Drag: Basic Conceptsp. 902
14.4 Drag Coefficientsp. 905
14.5 Lift and Drag of Airfoilsp. 926
14.6 Summaryp. 933
Problemsp. 935
Chapter 15 Open Channel Flow
15.1 Introductionp. 942
15.2 Basic Concepts in Open Channel Flowp. 945
15.3 The Importance of the Froude Numberp. 952
15.4 Energy Conservation in Open Channel Flowp. 978
15.5 Flow in a Channel of Uniform Depthp. 989
15.6 Flow in a Channel with Gradually Varying Depthp. 1003
15.7 Flow Under a Sluice Gatep. 1003
15.8 Flow Over a Weirp. 1009
15.9 Summaryp. 1012
Problemsp. 1014
Appendixes
Appendix A Fluid Property Data for Various Fluidsp. 1
Appendix B Properties of the U.S. Standard Atmospherep. 1
Appendix C Unit Conversion Factorsp. 1
Creditsp. 1
Indexp. 1
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